Florida Hurricane/Storm Damage Claims – Implied Warranty of Good Faith and Fair Dealing: Does it apply in claim by an Insured Against its Insurer for Failing to Investigate a Hurricane Loss in a Timely Manner?

It does not, so says the Florida Supreme Court in the case of QBE Ins. Corp. v. Chalfonte Condominium Apartment Ass’n, Inc. (May 2012), where Chalfonte Condominium sued their insurance company, QBE, arising out of a property damage loss from Hurricane Wilma.  Chalfonte submitted an estimate of damages to QBE on December 18, 2005, and then submitted a sworn proof of loss to QBE on July 12, 2006.  Not satisfied with QBE’s investigation and processing of its claim, Chalfonte filed suit in the United States District Court for the Southern District of Florida for among other things, breach of contract (breach of the implied warranty of good faith and fair dealing).

The jury found for Chalfonte on all of its claims, including the awarding of moneys for QBE’s breach of the implied warranty of good faith and fair dealing.  QBE would end up appealing the judgement to the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals, to which the Eleventh Circuit certified five questions to the Florida Supreme Court, one of which was the following:

Did Florida law recognize a claim for breach of the implied warranty of good faith and fair dealing by an insured against its insurer based on the insurer’s failure to investigate and assess the insured’s claim within a reasonable period of time?

Of note, the Florida Supreme Court recognized that “Florida courts imposed an independent duty on liability insurers to act in good faith when defending insureds against third-party claims,” and recognized a common law cause of action for bad faith within the context of third-party actions.  These  third-party bad-faith actions would involve a claim “in which an insured sues his liability insurance company for bad faith in failing to settle a claim which ultimately results in a third-party judgment against him in excess of the policy limits.”  The Florida Supreme Court then noted section 624.155 of the Florida Statutes (2009), specifically,  section 624.155(1)(b)(1), which created a statutory first-party bad-faith cause of action.    Section 624.155(1)(b)(1) states that “any person may bring a civil action against an insurer when such person is damaged…by the commission of any of the following acts by the insurer..not attempting in good faith to settle claims when, under all the circumstances, it could and should have done so, had it acted fairly and honestly toward its insured and with due regard for her or his interests…”

After reviewing the current status of “bad faith” law, the Florida Supreme Court, while acknowledging that “Florida contract law does recognize an implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing in every contract,” concluded that this implied covenant did not create a separate first-party action against an insurance company based on its bad-faith refusal to pay a claim.  Moreover, the Court held that “such first-party claims [by Chalfonte] are actually statutory bad-faith claims that must be brought under section 624.155 of the Florida Statutes.”

Moral of the story:  Florida does not recognize a claim for breach of the implied warranty of good faith and fair dealing by an insured against its insurance company for failing to investigate a hurricane loss, as such a claim is actually a statutory bad-faith claim that must be brought under section 624.155 of the Florida Statutes.  As such, Florida Hurricane/storm damage claims lawyers in Hollywood, Dania, Weston, Plantation, Aventura, Miami Beach, Bal Harbour, Coral Gables, Kendall, Pinecrest or other areas throughout Miami, Fort Lauderdale and Palm Beach, will now have to bring such a claim as a statutory bad-faith claim.

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